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Office

Microsoft Office is a proprietary commercial office suite of inter-related desktop applications, servers and services for the Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X operating systems, introduced by Microsoft in 1989. Initially a marketing term for a bundled set of applications, the first version of Office contained Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint. Over the years, Office applications have grown substantially closer with shared features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. Microsoft also positions Office as a development platform for line-of-business software under the Office Business Applications brand. According to Forrester Research, as of June 2009, some version of Microsoft Office is used in 80% of enterprises, with 64% of enterprises using Office 2007. 

An online version of Microsoft Office is also available for free as part of Windows Live, where you can create and edit Word, Excel and PowerPoint documents online and share them using Windows Live Skydrive.

The current versions are Office 2010 for Windows, released on June 15, 2010; and Office 2011 for Mac OS X, released October 26, 2010.

Microsoft Office 2013

posted Aug 27, 2013, 2:30 PM by Dushyanthan Devadoss   [ updated Aug 27, 2013, 2:42 PM ]

Microsoft Office 2013 (formerly Office 15) is a version of Microsoft Office, a productivity suite for Microsoft Windows. It is the successor of Microsoft Office 2010 and includes extended file format support, user interface updates and support for touch among its new features.

Microsoft Office 2013 comes in twelve different editions, including three editions for retail outlets, two editions for volume licensing channel, five subscription-based editions available through Microsoft Office 365 program, the web application edition known as Office Web Apps and the Microsoft Office RT edition made for tablets and mobile devices.

Office 365

The Office 365 online services (previously aimed towards business and enterprise users) were expanded for Office 2013 to include new plans aimed at home use. The subscriptions allow use of the Office 2013 applications (along with other services) by multiple users using a software as a service model. Different plans are available for Office 365, some of which also include value-added services, such as 20 GB of SkyDrive storage and 60 Skype minutes per month on the new Home Premium plan. These new subscription offerings were positioned as a new option for consumers wanting a cost-effective way to purchase and use Office on multiple computers in their household.

Office RT

A special version of Office 2013 known as Office 2013 Home & Student RT is shipped with all Windows RT devices, initially consisting of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote. This edition, whilst visually indistinguishable from normal versions of Office 2013, contains special optimizations for ARM-based devices, such as changes to reduce battery usage (including, for example, freezing the animation of the blinking cursor for text editing during periods of inactivity), enabling touch mode by default to improve usability on tablets, and using the graphics portion of a device's SoC for hardware acceleration.

Windows RT devices on launch were shipped with a "preview" version of Office Home & Student 2013 RT. The release date for the final version varied depending on the user’s language, and was distributed through Windows Update when released. On June 5, 2013, Microsoft announced that with the upcoming release of Windows RT 8.1, Outlook would be added to the suite in response to public demand. Office RT modifies or excludes other various features for compatibility reasons or resource reduction. To save disk space; templates, clip art, and language packs are downloaded online rather than stored locally. Other excluded features include the removal of support for third-party code such as macros/VBA/ActiveX controls, the removal of support for older media formats and narration in PowerPoint, editing of equations generated with the legacy Equation Editor, data models in Excel (PivotCharts, PivotTables, and QueryTables are unaffected), searching embedded media files in OneNote, along with data loss prevention, Group Policy support, and creating e-mails with information rights management in Outlook. 

As the version of Office RT included on Windows RT devices is based off the Home & Student version, it cannot be used for "commercial, nonprofit, or revenue-generating activities" unless the organization has a volume license for Office 2013 already, or the user has an Office 365 subscription with commercial use rights.

Office Mobile


Windows Phone 8 ships with an updated version of the Office Mobile suite, consisting of mobile versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote. In comparison to their Windows Phone 7 versions, the new versions add an improved Office Hub interface that can sync recently opened and modified documents (including changes to documents stored via Office 365 and SkyDrive), a separated OneNote app with additional features (such as voice notes and integration with the new "Rooms" functionality of the OS), and improved document editing and viewing functionality.

Microsoft released a version of Office Mobile for iPhone in June 2013 which offers similar features to its Windows Phone counterpart, but requires an Office 365 subscription to use. Office Mobile for Android was released in July 2013.

Microsoft Office for Mac 2011

posted Jul 12, 2011, 10:11 PM by Dushyanthan Devadoss   [ updated Aug 27, 2013, 2:23 PM ]

Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 is a version of the Microsoft Office productivity suite for Mac OS X. It is the successor to Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac and is comparable to Microsoft Office 2010 for Windows.

Microsoft Office 2011 includes more robust enterprise support and greater feature parity with the Windows edition. Its interface is now more similar to Office 2007 and 2010 for Windows, with the addition of the Ribbon. A new version of Outlook, written using Mac OS X's Cocoa API, returns to the Mac for the first time since 2001 and has full support for Exchange 2007.[citation needed] It replaces Entourage, which was included in Office 2004 and 2008 for Mac.[1] Support for Visual Basic for Applications macros returned after having been dropped in Office 2008.

In addition, Office 2011 supports online collaboration tools such as Windows Live SkyDrive and Office Web Apps, allowing Mac and Windows users to simultaneously edit documents over the web.

Office for Mac 2011 has a number of limitations compared to Office 2010 for Windows. Two editions are available to the general public. Home & Student provides Word, Excel and PowerPoint, while Home & Business adds Outlook and increased support. Microsoft Messenger 8 is included with both editions, and Microsoft Communicator for Mac 2011, which communicates with Microsoft Lync Server, is available only to volume licensing customers. Office 2011 requires an Intel Mac running Mac OS X 10.5.8 or higher.

Microsoft Office 2010

posted Jul 12, 2011, 10:03 PM by Dushyanthan Devadoss   [ updated Aug 27, 2013, 2:27 PM ]

Microsoft Office 2010 (also called Office 2010 and Office 14) is a productivity suite for Microsoft Windows, and the successor to Microsoft Office 2007. Office 2010 includes extended file format support, user interface updates, and a changed user experience. A 64-bit version of Office 2010 is available, although not for Windows XP or Windows Server 2003.

On April 15, 2010, Office 2010 was released to manufacturing. The suite became available for retail and online purchase on June 15, 2010. Office 2010 is the first version to require product activation for volume license editions. 

Office 2010 marks the debut of free online versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote, which work in the web browsers Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome and Safari, but not Opera. Office Starter 2010, a new edition of Office, replaced the low-end home productivity software, Microsoft Works.

Microsoft's update to its mobile productivity suite, Office Mobile 2010, will also be released for Windows Phones running Windows Mobile 6.5 and Windows Phone 7. In Office 2010, every application features the ribbon, including Outlook, OneNote, Publisher, InfoPath, SharePoint Workspace (previously known as Groove), and the new Office Web Apps.

Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac

posted Jul 12, 2011, 9:56 PM by Dushyanthan Devadoss   [ updated Jul 12, 2011, 10:09 PM ]


Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac is a version of the Microsoft Office productivity suite for Mac OS X. It supersedes Office 2004 for Mac and is the Mac OS X equivalent of Office 2007 (with software tools such as the compatibility layer Wine, Windows versions of Office may also run on Apple's various generations of computers and OS X operating system). Office 2008 was developed by Microsoft's Macintosh Business Unit and released on January 15, 2008. Office 2008 was the last version of Office for Mac to support Mac OS X Tiger (10.4.9 or higher) and Macs with a PowerPC processor (G4 or higher) as well as newer Macs with Intel processors. Office 2008 was followed by Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 released on October 26, 2010, requiring a Mac with an Intel processor and the version 10.5 Mac OS X Leopard or 10.6 Mac OS X Snow Leopard of the Apple OS X operating system.

Microsoft Office 2007

posted Jul 12, 2011, 9:36 PM by Dushyanthan Devadoss   [ updated Jul 12, 2011, 10:11 PM ]

Microsoft Office 2007 (officially called 2007 Microsoft Office System) is a Windows version of the Microsoft Office System, Microsoft's productivity suite. Formerly known as Office 12 in the initial stages of its beta cycle, it was released to volume license customers on November 30, 2006 and made available to retail customers on January 30, 2007. These are, respectively, the same dates Windows Vista was released to volume licensing and retail customers. Office 2007 contains a number of new features, the most notable of which is the entirely new graphical user interface called the Fluent User Interface (initially referred to as the Ribbon User Interface), replacing the menus and toolbars – which have been the cornerstone of Office since its inception – with a tabbed toolbar, known as the Ribbon. Office 2007 requires Windows XP with Service Pack 2 or higher, Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1 or higher, Windows Vista or Windows 7. Office 2007 is the last version of Microsoft Office which is officially supported on Windows XP Professional x64 Edition.

The 'Ribbon User Interface' is a task-oriented Graphical User Interface (GUI). It features a central menu button, widely known as the 'Office Button'. The Ribbon Interface has been improved in Microsoft Office 2010.

Office 2007 also includes new applications and server-side tools. Chief among these is Groove, a collaboration and communication suite for smaller businesses, which was originally developed by Groove Networks before being acquired by Microsoft in 2005. Also included is Office SharePoint Server 2007, a major revision to the server platform for Office applications, which supports "Excel Services", a client-server architecture for supporting Excel workbooks that are shared in real time between multiple machines, and are also viewable and editable through a web page.

Microsoft FrontPage has been removed from the Office suite entirely. It has been replaced by Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer, which is aimed towards development of SharePoint portals. Its 
designer-oriented counterpart Microsoft Expression Web is targeted for general web development. However, neither application has been included in Office 2007.
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Speech recognition and handwriting recognition are now part of Windows Vista. Speech and ink components have been removed from Office 2007. Handwriting and speech recognition work with Office 2007 only on Windows Vista or Windows XP Tablet PC Edition. However, XP users can use an earlier version of Office to use speech recognition.


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